Are Joggers Supposed To Be Tight?

By: Nancy Bourdin  |  Last Updated: October 8, 2021
I'm not going to lie; I used to think that jogging was only meant for the skinny guy with a flat stomach, and that's not the case. If you're looking to burn some calories without breaking a sweat, you can get in some great workouts with a pair of sneakers on your feet. From a fashion perspective, I'll be the first to admit that sneakers don't have the sex appeal of sneakers that look like high heels. However, you can't deny the fact that they can help you run longer distances with less effort on your body.

I've been debating about this one for a while. I'm a huge fan of running and jogging in general, but I've also noticed a trend among female joggers: they all seem to be wearing their jogging pants and pants in general very tight, but it doesn't look like they're jogging all that much. So, do joggers even need to wear tight pants?
Are Joggers Supposed To Be Tight

What kind of joggers is good for your health?

There seems to be a lot of confusion regarding the appropriate kind of jogger to use: the loose-fitting kind that allows free movement of the joints, or a tighter fitting type that prevents the muscles from moving. The answer isn't clear, but there are some misconceptions that can hurt your workouts.

Runners have an endless list of questions about their bodies. Sometimes it's about how much they should exercise, or what kind of shoes they should wear, or how many calories they should eat every day. The answer to all of these questions is, "It depends." Since there's no single answer that works for everybody, some runners just want to get the most out of every workout, and those runners recommend that you should wear snug-fitting top or shorts.

The best time to wear joggers?

The best time to wear joggers? Well, this is not something most people have thought about, and in fact there isn't a right or wrong answer. It really depends on what kind of running you're doing – some joggers, like athletic track pants, are better off worn later in the morning or early in the evening. Is your run a casual stroll between meetings, or a longer run in the heat? Then you might want to get them in the morning.

How to make joggers comfy?

Have you ever tried on a pair of sports pants that you thought were comfy only to find out that they were actually quite short? If you are one of the millions of people that is constantly searching for the perfect pair of joggers to wear on the go, then you are in luck! With a few small changes you can make a pair of joggers that are comfy and cool!

When it comes to keeping your joggers comfy during exercise, many people find that adding compression shorts makes a huge difference. The main reason is to prevent "jogger chafing" (the burning sensation that can occur when you wear sweatpants, leggings, or joggers without compression). Everyone is different, so finding the right compression shorts for a comfortable fit is important.

There are many ways to make your running experience more comfortable—and much of it is in the details. Here are some tips on how to make your joggers more comfortable:
Buy the right size
When buying sports bras, ask for size small and up
Buy the right shoes
Find a pair of shoes with a good traction surface
Consider how you will be using the shoes
Check your socks and laces
Invest in a good pair of compression socks
Upgrade your sportswear
About the Author:
Thomas Miller
Nancy Bourdin
Nancy Bourdin knows her way around food and how it may affect ones’ fitness. She is a certified nutrition expert and believes a natural and holistic approach is the key to fulfilling health. Over the past years, Bourdin has influenced and trained several people to switch to yoga and Pilates to get in the best possible shape.
* The information contained within this site is not intended as a substitute for professional medical advice. If you have, expect to have, or suspect you may have any medical condition, you are urged to consult with a health care provider . These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any diseases or medical conditions. Results are based on the Holistic Reviews Ranking System and do not necessarily reflect typical results from the use of these products.
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